unconsumption:

Plastic bottle caps = art. 
These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here. 
See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.
(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

unconsumption:

Plastic bottle caps = art.

These caps are nailed to a pole in Ellensburg, Washington, at the folk art site known as Dick and Jane’s Spot. Info about Dick and Jane, and the Spot, a.k.a. their home, can be found here

See the "plastic" subset of the Unconsumption archive for more plastic-turned-art examples.

(Photo by woodendesigner on Flickr.)

(via mothernaturenetwork)

draw-yourmind:

Definition of ignorance.

….and that’s exactly the kind of interaction that cements my inclination NOT to mix with others

draw-yourmind:

Definition of ignorance.

….and that’s exactly the kind of interaction that cements my inclination NOT to mix with others

(via cognitivedissonance)

asker

beyondtheselenses asked: I'm in need of some guidance, Lazy Yogi. I want to no longer be so cruel to myself and only grow stronger. I want to get to know myself better and fall in love with who I am. For years I have put myself down and told myself and others how unworthy I am as a being. I've let myself believe I have no worth in living and although some days are better then most, the bad days are so low it's hard to look in the mirror and appreciate myself. I just want to fall in love with myself in all that I am.

lazyyogi:

You are not found in a mirror, sister. You are not found in your thoughts about yourself nor your judgments. Stop telling yourself who you are—you don’t know. If you knew who you truly were, you would be at peace. So find out. 

You are more beautiful than the body can reflect. You are more brilliant than the mind can grasp. You are more wondrous than any transient emotion. Don’t trust any of those things to tell you who you are. 

“The most difficult times for many of us are the ones we give ourselves.” ~ Pema Chodron

Who would you be without this story of worthiness and cruelty? You would be free. True freedom is not different from Love and Happiness. They come together as One.

Many of us in western society have a habit of objectifying our own identity and then creating a relationship with that identity. However, like any relationship, it wont work out because you haven’t actually gotten to know the living being to whom you have assigned an identity. 

When you judge yourself harshly, who is doing the judging? What is being judged? If it were true, how could it ever change? If it isn’t true, then what could possibly need to be changed?

Whether you are cruel to yourself or appreciating yourself, you are still avoiding the central issue: Who is that self? Not in terms of personality, likes, dislikes, talents, hobbies, and preferences, but as a Living Existence.

So long as you have this kind of relationship with the idea you have of yourself, then it is best to extend yourself some kindness and compassion. 

"If your compassion does not include yourself then it is incomplete." ~ Jack Kornfield

Make love and compassion a way of life. 

All bodies and identities are in a process of coming together and falling apart. Don’t build your castle of love and happiness on those shifting sands.

Another way of looking at it is this: You are God’s creation. You didn’t ask to be born, you didn’t design your body, you didn’t assemble your mind and senses. All of it just happened. 

Who are you to judge it? Who are you to understand it? You didn’t begin with the body and you do not end with the body. 

There is nothing wrong with aspiring to love who you are, but it is not enough. You must go further than that and realize that you are Love itself. Only then will you be free from this form of suffering. And you can be! Because you are nothing other than Love. 

Nobody is superior, nobody is inferior, but nobody is equal either. People are simply unique, incomparable. You are you, I am I. I have to contribute my potential to life; you have to contribute your potential to life. I have to discover my own being; you have to discover your own being.” ~ Osho

I would recommend taking up a daily meditation and tonglen practice, both of which you can read about on the meditation page of my blog. I’d also suggest any books written by Jack Kornfield, Pema Chodron, The Dalai Lama, and Eckhart Tolle. 

We must heal ourselves. There is no other option if humanity is to survive. Let this be your contribution.

Namaste sis :) Much love.

People who read books in public places are regarded with suspicion because they appear self-sufficient. When you seem self-sufficient, other people think that you think you’re better than them, and they get resentful. Jessica Zafra, Chicken Pox for the Soul (via bookmania)
When I think about travel and its impact on my career, I think travel taught me how to observe. My parents would take my brother and I to Egypt frequently. I didn’t know what was going on half the time, but I had to pick up things quickly. I became a pretty good observer at 6 or 7 years old. And that’s a lot of what I do in my films. It’s a humbling position to watch and pick up context, especially when you don’t know a language and have to figure things out as you go. I had to focus on other things. I would focus on social cues, body language and gestures. I think that’s what travel did for me. It opened up my understanding of how people communicate. It was the first time I was put in the observer position because I was no longer the center of attention at such a young age. I had to watch other people. — Heidi Saman — Short Journeys (via secondsminuteshours)
doctorwho:

Oisin and Ronan Kang-O’Higgins (ages 10 and 8) from Seattle, WA couldn’t paint their walls, so they used painter’s tape and construction paper to make a TARDIS on the French doors in their bedroom.

doctorwho:

Oisin and Ronan Kang-O’Higgins (ages 10 and 8) from Seattle, WA couldn’t paint their walls, so they used painter’s tape and construction paper to make a TARDIS on the French doors in their bedroom.

unconsumption:


Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

unconsumption:

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

housingworksbookstore:

lastnightsreading:

Kathleen Hale at Housing Works Bookstore, 4/15/14
Buy the drawing here.

Kathleen Hale, author of No One Else Can Have You, was charming and hilarious at last night’s panel of first-time authors. We have signed copies here, come get one! Her signature is pretty much the best signature ever. You’ll see.

housingworksbookstore:

lastnightsreading:

Kathleen Hale at Housing Works Bookstore, 4/15/14

Buy the drawing here.

Kathleen Hale, author of No One Else Can Have You, was charming and hilarious at last night’s panel of first-time authors. We have signed copies here, come get one! Her signature is pretty much the best signature ever. You’ll see.

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

ourpresidents:

Helen Thomas - First Female Member of the White House Press Corps 
Veteran journalist Helen Thomas served in the White House press corps under ten presidents, and became the first female member of the group during President Kennedy’s administration. An advocate for women’s rights, Thomas convinced President Kennedy not to attend annual dinners for White House correspondents and photographers if women were not invited.
Pictured: President Kennedy speaks with Thomas in the Rose Garden, April 1963. 
-from the JFK Library 

ourpresidents:

Helen Thomas - First Female Member of the White House Press Corps

Veteran journalist Helen Thomas served in the White House press corps under ten presidents, and became the first female member of the group during President Kennedy’s administration. An advocate for women’s rights, Thomas convinced President Kennedy not to attend annual dinners for White House correspondents and photographers if women were not invited.

Pictured: President Kennedy speaks with Thomas in the Rose Garden, April 1963. 

-from the JFK Library 

dcu:

jsarevisited:

thehappysorceress:

DC Superhero Cities by BatmanBrony


Nice little map.

dcu:

jsarevisited:

thehappysorceress:

DC Superhero Cities by BatmanBrony

Nice little map.

iloveoldmagazines:

Orange Coast
Apr 1982

iloveoldmagazines:

Orange Coast

Apr 1982